Saving Avery

Why We Saved Avery – A Sedona Story

Something fun is going on, can I join?

Something fun is going on, can I join?

Sometime in late February, we were contacted by Hempstead Shelter about Avery, an 8 year-old female German Shepherd dog. Avery had been found as a stray by the local police department and turned into the shelter. No one had claimed Avery and the shelter was looking for a rescue organization to take Avery. Normally, Long Island is outside of our working area, but we were going to be in the area one Saturday and decided to take a ride out to meet Avery.

Avery at shelter with her tail bandaged.

Avery at shelter with her tail bandaged.

After spending some time with the spunky little shepherd, it was clear that Avery was up against some long odds of anyone from the general public coming in to the shelter and adopting her. Avery’s back end and hips were wobbling, she was listed as 8 years old, and she would need to be the only dog in the household. Those are tough odds for any dog in a shelter environment.

Avery - Patiently waiting

Avery – Patiently waiting

We kept in touch with one of the shelter managers and cross-posted Avery’s picture and story to help generate some interest in hopes that Avery might be adopted from the shelter. There were no takers for Avery and no other rescues available or that had the resources to take in Avery, a dog that with a low probability of being adopted, a dog that might possibly need surgery or some other type of rehabilitation program for her weak hips.

Avery is always ready to play ball

Avery is always ready to play ball

It didn’t take any strong engineering or financial skills to do a cost analysis or probability tree to realize that we would be taking a risk bringing her into our program. We knew that there was a high likelihood that she would be in our program permanently. The cold hard facts are that each rescue, big or small, has finite resources and sometimes has to say “no.” The shelter had gone above and beyond for Avery, especially given that she had no takers for a number of months.

Avery was out of options and soon to be out of time. Despite knowing the odds were stacked against her, to turn our back on Avery would be to turn our back on our mission. In rescue sometimes you just have to believe. Our mission at Sedona is to take that leap of faith on a dog like Avery. Since being in our care, Avery has responded well to her acupuncture treatments, though she still continues to wobble in her hips when she is active. She has a little motor in her that never stops and Avery just loves to chase her tennis ball, or soccer ball.

Miss Avery

Miss Avery

Like all dogs, Avery has her little quirks that only make her more adorable to us. In the first month in our program we had three potential adopters or foster homes, but each fell through for different reasons. We are still looking for her guardian angel to provide her with a home to play in, sleep in, enjoy her retirement years and provide her new family with companionship and joy. Please help us make Avery’s story complete and allow us to take leaps on faith with other dogs like Avery. You can help sponsor Avery through her Go Fund Me campaign.

GEMMA – Finds Her New Family

G1 MontageWhen we first met Gemma at Newark Shelter we were immediately drawn to her.  How could we not be?  Much like Sedona, Gemma was a frightened white German Shepherd and we knew from speaking with volunteers at the shelter that there was no interest in anyone adopting Gemma.  She was curled up in her run and it took effort and coaxing to bring her out of her run.  Once Gemma was outside, she began to cautiously check out her surroundings and warm up to people.

Gemma FH5Gemma settled in nicely to her foster home the first evening.  However, after a day, her foster mom, who is a veterinarian, realized that there was something medically wrong.  Even after a number of baths, Gemma had an odd odor and she suddenly became very defensive around the other dogs in the house.   Upon further investigation, it appeared that Gemma most likely had a litter a few months prior to entering our program and had a dangerous infection in her uterus.

Gemma AAH9Gemma was a trooper during her stay at American Animal Hospital for treatment and surgery.  For the first week her hormones were out of whack and while she was super friendly to the staff, she did not want to be bothered with other animals.  As we prepared her to return to a foster home, she began to again show a lack of interest in other dogs.

An experienced German Shepherd owner, who had a Shepherd of her own and four cats was moved Gemma’s story and her pictures.  When her soon to be new family first met Gemma, everyone knew right away that it would be good fit.  Gemma would finally have a family that would truly care for her and a new pack of her own to make her feel safe and secure.

Photo Mar 15, 7 24 53 AM

Gemma Success Collage
Gemma Valentine Day A